Reflective Apparel takes pride in supplying quality high visibility garments since 1989. Originally founded to support the public safety market’s need for nighttime reflectivity, RA was at the forefront of the ANSI standard for High Visibility. Over the years we have added a complete line of ANSI 107-2015 Compliant garments. VEA® is our registered trademark and assures you not only a highly visible garment but a comfortable and durable one as well. We start with premium components such as YKK™ zippers, 3M™ Scotchlite™ Reflective Materials, 3M™ Thinsulate™ and Teflon™ coatings. Breathable fabrics coupled with quality sewing production provides a top value for our customers.

ANSI FAQ

What is difference between ANSI/ISEA 107-1999 and ANSI/ISEA 107-2010?

The revision in 2010 was primarily a clarification of intent on the part of ANSI. The three garment classes were to be based upon the wearer’s activities and determined by the total square inches of florescent background materials and the reflective materials. The addition of headwear to the list of items covered and the inclusion of logos were reviewed. Distinctions between woven and knitted background materials rounded out the revision.

Class I – Apparel for use in activities that permit the wearer’s full and undivided attention to approaching traffic. There is ample separation of workers from traffic. Example – parking lot attendants.

Class II – Apparel for use in activities where greater visibility is necessary during inclement weather or in work environments higher risks. Workers who perform tasks that divert their attention from approaching traffic or those with proximity to passing vehicles require a minimum of Class II. Example: Railway worker.

Class III – Apparel for the highest level of visibility for workers facing serious hazards and/or high task loads that require attention away from their work. Garments cover more of the body, such as arms and legs to differentiate the worker from inanimate objects such as cones. Example: highway construction or flagger.

Should I personalize or logo my apparel?

The revision in 2010 was primarily a clarification of intent on the part of ANSI. The three garment classes were to be based upon the wearer’s activities and determined by the total square inches of florescent background materials and the reflective materials. The addition of headwear to the list of items covered and the inclusion of logos were reviewed. Distinctions between woven and knitted background materials rounded out the revision.

Class I – Apparel for use in activities that permit the wearer’s full and undivided attention to approaching traffic. There is ample separation of workers from traffic. Example – parking lot attendants.

Class II – Apparel for use in activities where greater visibility is necessary during inclement weather or in work environments higher risks. Workers who perform tasks that divert their attention from approaching traffic or those with proximity to passing vehicles require a minimum of Class II. Example: Railway worker.

Class III – Apparel for the highest level of visibility for workers facing serious hazards and/or high task loads that require attention away from their work. Garments cover more of the body, such as arms and legs to differentiate the worker from inanimate objects such as cones. Example: highway construction or flagger.

Who decides what ANSI class I need to buy?

The revision in 2010 was primarily a clarification of intent on the part of ANSI. The three garment classes were to be based upon the wearer’s activities and determined by the total square inches of florescent background materials and the reflective materials. The addition of headwear to the list of items covered and the inclusion of logos were reviewed. Distinctions between woven and knitted background materials rounded out the revision.

Class I – Apparel for use in activities that permit the wearer’s full and undivided attention to approaching traffic. There is ample separation of workers from traffic. Example – parking lot attendants.

Class II – Apparel for use in activities where greater visibility is necessary during inclement weather or in work environments higher risks. Workers who perform tasks that divert their attention from approaching traffic or those with proximity to passing vehicles require a minimum of Class II. Example: Railway worker.

Class III – Apparel for the highest level of visibility for workers facing serious hazards and/or high task loads that require attention away from their work. Garments cover more of the body, such as arms and legs to differentiate the worker from inanimate objects such as cones. Example: highway construction or flagger.

Polyester is hotter than cotton, is there another option?

The revision in 2010 was primarily a clarification of intent on the part of ANSI. The three garment classes were to be based upon the wearer’s activities and determined by the total square inches of florescent background materials and the reflective materials. The addition of headwear to the list of items covered and the inclusion of logos were reviewed. Distinctions between woven and knitted background materials rounded out the revision.

Class I – Apparel for use in activities that permit the wearer’s full and undivided attention to approaching traffic. There is ample separation of workers from traffic. Example – parking lot attendants.

Class II – Apparel for use in activities where greater visibility is necessary during inclement weather or in work environments higher risks. Workers who perform tasks that divert their attention from approaching traffic or those with proximity to passing vehicles require a minimum of Class II. Example: Railway worker.

Class III – Apparel for the highest level of visibility for workers facing serious hazards and/or high task loads that require attention away from their work. Garments cover more of the body, such as arms and legs to differentiate the worker from inanimate objects such as cones. Example: highway construction or flagger.

Why is the lime-yellow color more prevalent in the US market?

The revision in 2010 was primarily a clarification of intent on the part of ANSI. The three garment classes were to be based upon the wearer’s activities and determined by the total square inches of florescent background materials and the reflective materials. The addition of headwear to the list of items covered and the inclusion of logos were reviewed. Distinctions between woven and knitted background materials rounded out the revision.

Class I – Apparel for use in activities that permit the wearer’s full and undivided attention to approaching traffic. There is ample separation of workers from traffic. Example – parking lot attendants.

Class II – Apparel for use in activities where greater visibility is necessary during inclement weather or in work environments higher risks. Workers who perform tasks that divert their attention from approaching traffic or those with proximity to passing vehicles require a minimum of Class II. Example: Railway worker.

Class III – Apparel for the highest level of visibility for workers facing serious hazards and/or high task loads that require attention away from their work. Garments cover more of the body, such as arms and legs to differentiate the worker from inanimate objects such as cones. Example: highway construction or flagger.

What colors of ANSI garments can I select?

The revision in 2010 was primarily a clarification of intent on the part of ANSI. The three garment classes were to be based upon the wearer’s activities and determined by the total square inches of florescent background materials and the reflective materials. The addition of headwear to the list of items covered and the inclusion of logos were reviewed. Distinctions between woven and knitted background materials rounded out the revision.

Class I – Apparel for use in activities that permit the wearer’s full and undivided attention to approaching traffic. There is ample separation of workers from traffic. Example – parking lot attendants.

Class II – Apparel for use in activities where greater visibility is necessary during inclement weather or in work environments higher risks. Workers who perform tasks that divert their attention from approaching traffic or those with proximity to passing vehicles require a minimum of Class II. Example: Railway worker.

Class III – Apparel for the highest level of visibility for workers facing serious hazards and/or high task loads that require attention away from their work. Garments cover more of the body, such as arms and legs to differentiate the worker from inanimate objects such as cones. Example: highway construction or flagger.

Can I buy cotton ANSI and still be compliant?

The revision in 2010 was primarily a clarification of intent on the part of ANSI. The three garment classes were to be based upon the wearer’s activities and determined by the total square inches of florescent background materials and the reflective materials. The addition of headwear to the list of items covered and the inclusion of logos were reviewed. Distinctions between woven and knitted background materials rounded out the revision.

Class I – Apparel for use in activities that permit the wearer’s full and undivided attention to approaching traffic. There is ample separation of workers from traffic. Example – parking lot attendants.

Class II – Apparel for use in activities where greater visibility is necessary during inclement weather or in work environments higher risks. Workers who perform tasks that divert their attention from approaching traffic or those with proximity to passing vehicles require a minimum of Class II. Example: Railway worker.

Class III – Apparel for the highest level of visibility for workers facing serious hazards and/or high task loads that require attention away from their work. Garments cover more of the body, such as arms and legs to differentiate the worker from inanimate objects such as cones. Example: highway construction or flagger.

How should I wash my ANSI garments?

The revision in 2010 was primarily a clarification of intent on the part of ANSI. The three garment classes were to be based upon the wearer’s activities and determined by the total square inches of florescent background materials and the reflective materials. The addition of headwear to the list of items covered and the inclusion of logos were reviewed. Distinctions between woven and knitted background materials rounded out the revision.

Class I – Apparel for use in activities that permit the wearer’s full and undivided attention to approaching traffic. There is ample separation of workers from traffic. Example – parking lot attendants.

Class II – Apparel for use in activities where greater visibility is necessary during inclement weather or in work environments higher risks. Workers who perform tasks that divert their attention from approaching traffic or those with proximity to passing vehicles require a minimum of Class II. Example: Railway worker.

Class III – Apparel for the highest level of visibility for workers facing serious hazards and/or high task loads that require attention away from their work. Garments cover more of the body, such as arms and legs to differentiate the worker from inanimate objects such as cones. Example: highway construction or flagger.

What types of Retroreflective materials are available?

The revision in 2010 was primarily a clarification of intent on the part of ANSI. The three garment classes were to be based upon the wearer’s activities and determined by the total square inches of florescent background materials and the reflective materials. The addition of headwear to the list of items covered and the inclusion of logos were reviewed. Distinctions between woven and knitted background materials rounded out the revision.

Class I – Apparel for use in activities that permit the wearer’s full and undivided attention to approaching traffic. There is ample separation of workers from traffic. Example – parking lot attendants.

Class II – Apparel for use in activities where greater visibility is necessary during inclement weather or in work environments higher risks. Workers who perform tasks that divert their attention from approaching traffic or those with proximity to passing vehicles require a minimum of Class II. Example: Railway worker.

Class III – Apparel for the highest level of visibility for workers facing serious hazards and/or high task loads that require attention away from their work. Garments cover more of the body, such as arms and legs to differentiate the worker from inanimate objects such as cones. Example: highway construction or flagger.

3M™ Reflective Materials

3M™ Reflective Materials are composed of wide angle, exposed retroreflective lenses bonded with a special polymer layer. In plain terms, microscopic glass spheres acting like mirrors are glued, with abrasion & wash resistant adhesive, to various materials that we can apply to apparel. The spherical shape of the lenses bounce light back towards the the viewer in a prism-like fashion. The effect is that the material “glows” when viewed from an angle close to a light source. The most common light source being your vehicles headlights. This means that more light is sent back towards the viewer, even if the person wearing the safety apparel is turned away.

Reflective Apparel manufactures with a variety of fabric’s that require different 3M™ Reflective Material solutions. Transfer films have adhesive backing that can be readily applied to a t-shirt. Unfortunately, the mesh fabric of a lightweight vest has holes and needs to have a reflective material already affixed to a solid fabric backing that is sewn onto the garment.

3M™ manufactures their reflective material by series number. You may notice slighty different, but similar material numbers due to advances in material releases. For example: to combat low quality knock-off material being sold under their name, 3M™ has begun to laser mark their material with a “holographic” 3M watermark. 3M™ Scotchlite™ Reflective Material - 8710 Silver Transfer Film and 3M™ Scotchlite™ Reflective Material - 8712 Silver Transfer Film are virtually identical, except the latter is marked.

3M™ Reflective Materials

The revision in 2010 was primarily a clarification of intent on the part of ANSI. The three garment classes were to be based upon the wearer’s activities and determined by the total square inches of florescent background materials and the reflective materials. The addition of headwear to the list of items covered and the inclusion of logos were reviewed. Distinctions between woven and knitted background materials rounded out the revision.

Class I – Apparel for use in activities that permit the wearer’s full and undivided attention to approaching traffic. There is ample separation of workers from traffic. Example – parking lot attendants.

Class II – Apparel for use in activities where greater visibility is necessary during inclement weather or in work environments higher risks. Workers who perform tasks that divert their attention from approaching traffic or those with proximity to passing vehicles require a minimum of Class II. Example: Railway worker.

Class III – Apparel for the highest level of visibility for workers facing serious hazards and/or high task loads that require attention away from their work. Garments cover more of the body, such as arms and legs to differentiate the worker from inanimate objects such as cones. Example: highway construction or flagger.

3M™ Scotchlite™ Reflective Material - 8710 Silver Transfer Film

The revision in 2010 was primarily a clarification of intent on the part of ANSI. The three garment classes were to be based upon the wearer’s activities and determined by the total square inches of florescent background materials and the reflective materials. The addition of headwear to the list of items covered and the inclusion of logos were reviewed. Distinctions between woven and knitted background materials rounded out the revision.

Class I – Apparel for use in activities that permit the wearer’s full and undivided attention to approaching traffic. There is ample separation of workers from traffic. Example – parking lot attendants.

Class II – Apparel for use in activities where greater visibility is necessary during inclement weather or in work environments higher risks. Workers who perform tasks that divert their attention from approaching traffic or those with proximity to passing vehicles require a minimum of Class II. Example: Railway worker.

Class III – Apparel for the highest level of visibility for workers facing serious hazards and/or high task loads that require attention away from their work. Garments cover more of the body, such as arms and legs to differentiate the worker from inanimate objects such as cones. Example: highway construction or flagger.

3M™ Scotchlite™ Reflective Material - 8906 Silver Fabric Trim

The revision in 2010 was primarily a clarification of intent on the part of ANSI. The three garment classes were to be based upon the wearer’s activities and determined by the total square inches of florescent background materials and the reflective materials. The addition of headwear to the list of items covered and the inclusion of logos were reviewed. Distinctions between woven and knitted background materials rounded out the revision.

Class I – Apparel for use in activities that permit the wearer’s full and undivided attention to approaching traffic. There is ample separation of workers from traffic. Example – parking lot attendants.

Class II – Apparel for use in activities where greater visibility is necessary during inclement weather or in work environments higher risks. Workers who perform tasks that divert their attention from approaching traffic or those with proximity to passing vehicles require a minimum of Class II. Example: Railway worker.

Class III – Apparel for the highest level of visibility for workers facing serious hazards and/or high task loads that require attention away from their work. Garments cover more of the body, such as arms and legs to differentiate the worker from inanimate objects such as cones. Example: highway construction or flagger.

3M™ Scotchlite™ Reflective Material - 8910 Silver Fabric

The revision in 2010 was primarily a clarification of intent on the part of ANSI. The three garment classes were to be based upon the wearer’s activities and determined by the total square inches of florescent background materials and the reflective materials. The addition of headwear to the list of items covered and the inclusion of logos were reviewed. Distinctions between woven and knitted background materials rounded out the revision.

Class I – Apparel for use in activities that permit the wearer’s full and undivided attention to approaching traffic. There is ample separation of workers from traffic. Example – parking lot attendants.

Class II – Apparel for use in activities where greater visibility is necessary during inclement weather or in work environments higher risks. Workers who perform tasks that divert their attention from approaching traffic or those with proximity to passing vehicles require a minimum of Class II. Example: Railway worker.

Class III – Apparel for the highest level of visibility for workers facing serious hazards and/or high task loads that require attention away from their work. Garments cover more of the body, such as arms and legs to differentiate the worker from inanimate objects such as cones. Example: highway construction or flagger.

3M™ Scotchlite™ Reflective Material - 8935 Silver Industrial Wash Flame Resistant Fabric

The revision in 2010 was primarily a clarification of intent on the part of ANSI. The three garment classes were to be based upon the wearer’s activities and determined by the total square inches of florescent background materials and the reflective materials. The addition of headwear to the list of items covered and the inclusion of logos were reviewed. Distinctions between woven and knitted background materials rounded out the revision.

Class I – Apparel for use in activities that permit the wearer’s full and undivided attention to approaching traffic. There is ample separation of workers from traffic. Example – parking lot attendants.

Class II – Apparel for use in activities where greater visibility is necessary during inclement weather or in work environments higher risks. Workers who perform tasks that divert their attention from approaching traffic or those with proximity to passing vehicles require a minimum of Class II. Example: Railway worker.

Class III – Apparel for the highest level of visibility for workers facing serious hazards and/or high task loads that require attention away from their work. Garments cover more of the body, such as arms and legs to differentiate the worker from inanimate objects such as cones. Example: highway construction or flagger.

How Does Our Systems Gear Work?

Our High Visibility Systems Gear is designed to have interchangeable parkas, jackets, and sweatshirts. Choose a breathable, waterproof parka, then zip in your choice of jacket or sweatshirt to create a complete modular system that meets your high visibility and safety needs.

STEP 1 >

CHOOSE YOUR PARKA

The parka will act as the outer jacket, creating a waterproof and breathable shell. The Parka has special zippers and snaps to connect to your choice of an inner coat. See the diagram below. The inner coat can be chosen depending on the need of the wearer. You can chose a warm fleece sweatshirt or a 3-season jacket:

VEA-431-ST-LM in lime
VEA-431-ST-OR in orange
VEA-431-ST-LB in 2-tone lime/black

VEA-431-ST-OB in 2-tone Orange/black
VEA-431-CS-LB in 2-tone lime/black with contrasting orange tape

STEP 2 >

CHOOSE YOUR INNER COAT

The combined 2 jackets will be waterproof and breathable. Anytime your need changes, just unzip and unsnap the inner coat and each jacket can be worn separately or the whole system can be reconfigured.

VEA-421-ST-LM High Visibility 3 Season Jacket in lime
VEA-421-ST-OR High Visibility 3 Season Jacket in orange
VEA-602-ST-LM High Visibility Sweatshirt in lime

VEA-602-ST-OR High Visibility Sweatshirt in orange
VEA-602-ST-LB High Visibility Sweatshirt in 2-tone lime/black
VEA-603-ST-LB High Visibility Thermal Lined Full Zip Hoodie in 2-tone lime/black

STEP 3 >

CREATE YOUR TOTAL CHOICE MODULAR SYSTEM